Cui Feng High Mountain Oolong Tea | Eco-Cha Tea Club

October 08, 2019

Batch #47 of the Eco-Cha Tea Club was procured from our ongoing source of Da Yu Ling High Mountain Oolong. The proprietor of our local tea packaging facility and tea wholesaler has cooperated with this farmer who manages the farms in both Cui Feng and Da Yu Ling for many years. Our friend has consulted in both farm management and tea processing in order to have reliable produce from two of Taiwan's most prestigious place names for High Mountain Oolong Tea.

Cui Feng is located on the southwestern slopes of He Huan Mountain range, between the Qing Jing Farm scenic area and the pass at Wuling. Da Yu Ling is on the northeastern side of this range, but they are not very far apart, as the crow flies. It is said that the climate, based on the northeastern wind patterns that circulate through the area referred to simply as the "northern line", provides Da Yu Ling with the prime tea growing conditions. But the more we learn about the micro-factors of slope, soil, and sunlight exposure — the more we are convinced that it depends at least as much on each individual plot of tea and how it is managed in determining the quality that it produces. Of course the processing of any day's harvest of tea is also a primary contributing factor to its quality.

We can see from these photos that these Cui Feng plots of tea have two fundamental assets of being on a gradual (rather than steep) slope, and they are on or near a ridge. The gradual slope provides moisture retention in the soil, and also prevents the fertilizer from being washed away in heavy rain. Located on or near a ridge offers maximum sun exposure 

In general, our friend has been committed to processing the leaves from these high elevation farms significantly more than the standard High Mountain Oolong. We feel that this is a crucial factor in producing a distinctive quality of tea. And finally, sourcing these teas at the summer harvest is a sustainable choice, in order to offer some of the finest quality at a much more reasonable price than the overly promoted spring and winter harvests.

We are bereaved to acknowledge the loss of our friend and mentor who passed earlier this year. We fully intend to continue working with his family and the farmers they cooperate with to source these teas. The knowledge and experience that he openly shared with us will always be cherished.

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