Cui Feng High Mountain Oolong Tea Tasting Notes | Eco-Cha Tea Club

October 13, 2019 0 Comments

Eco-Cha Dry Oolong Tea Leaves

Batch #47 of the Eco-Cha Tea Club is a High Mountain Oolong Tea from the Cui Feng region on He Huan Mountain in Ren Ai Township, Nantou County, Taiwan. This batch was harvested from a plot of tea at about 1900m in August 2019, just before a rain spell. The images of the dried leaves above and the brewed leaves below show that they were harvested just at the right time — nearly mature, but not past their prime stage of growth.

Eco-Cha wet Oolong Tea leaves

The prominent features of this batch of tea are the growing region, the farming methods, weather conditions on the day of harvest, and the degree of oxidation in the leaves in their processing. These factors offer us a premium quality High Mountain Oolong Tea. 

The brewed tea offers a creamy, soft pine aroma with a smooth, savory/vegetal character that is very satisfying. It has a lingering, thick yet mild floral aftertaste, with a touch of heady spice. It's this integrated composition that we have come to appreciate most about High Mountain Oolongs. When there is sufficient complexity, combined with a thick, smooth constitution that actually shines the most after it has cooled down, it rates high on our Oolong score chart!

Eco-Cha Oolong Tea Color

We found this batch of tea very much worth sharing in order to represent what we have determined to be some of the best quality produce available from the High Mountain Tea  industry here in Taiwan. We are also inspired to introduce our tea club members to the more sustainable option of sourcing crops from these prestigious areas at their second harvest — between the highly marketed spring and winter harvests. Seasonal distinctions are becoming less consistent with the changing climate —  the tea farmers know more about this than any of us tea lovers! So it's about supporting the sources, and allowing us to understand the local tea culture more fully — providing us with the skill of discernment.

Beautiful Chinese Tea Set | Eco-Cha Teas

So please let us know what you think about this batch of High Mountain Tea, and also please post any questions you may have about this month's edition of the Eco-Cha Tea Club!

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What did you think of this article? Have any questions? What's your favorite type of high mountain tea? We really want to know what you think! Leave any thoughts or questions in the comment section below!

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