Da Yu Ling High Mountain Oolong Tasting Notes | Eco-Cha Tea Club

September 08, 2018 0 Comments

Da Yu Ling High Mountain Oolong brewed tea leaves

This month's  batch of Da Yu Ling High Mountain Oolong tea being shared with the Eco-Cha Tea Club is sufficiently oxidized and unroasted. This style of processing transforms the fresh, green character into a more balanced, sweeter, full bodied brew while maintaining the delicate floral and vegetal aromatic notes.

Gong fu tea brewing set with using two pitchers

The brewing arrangement shown above includes a spouted gaiwan brewing pot and two pitchers. This allows each brew to be poured into an empty pitcher to be tasted on its own. Then, the remainder of each can be poured into a second pitcher to be enjoyed later, after each successive brew has been experienced.

Da Yu LIng High Mountain Tea leaves brewed in a gaiwan

We used 9g of tea leaves in a 150ml porcelain gaiwan, and brewed it for about 1 minute per brew, extending the brewing time slightly each time. Using this method, these leaves can be brewed at least six times, or more.

The aroma of the brewed leaves is a deep, foresty green combined with subtle sweet pastry and floral notes. The brew is smooth on the palate, balanced, with creamy vegetal and delicate flowery notes, and a vibrant, lingering finish.

Da Yu Ling High Mountain Oolong brewed tea in a white porcelain tea cup

In addition to the broader spectrum of fresh vibrant notes that the highest elevation teas offer, there is a substantial consistency and smoothness of texture that these thicker heartier leaves  produce. The main reason for this is the greater daily temperature changes between night and day, which results in higher concentrations of particular compounds in the leaves that produce these flavor characteristics.

Da Yu Ling High Mountain Tea leaves - dried and rolled

We look forward to hearing about our Tea Club members' experiences of this batch of tea that we are proud to be able to share in both a sustainable and an exclusive way.

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