Eco-Cha Tea Club: Honey Oolong Tea Tasting Notes

August 12, 2018 1 Comment

Eco-Cha Tea Club Honey Oolong - dried leaves

Batch #33 being shared with the Eco-Cha Tea Club is well oxidized, and lightly roasted. The leaves were processed to be made into a traditional style Dong Ding Oolong Tea. But upon being roasted once, they revealed their bug-bitten character by offering distinct honey notes in the flavor profile. 

Eco-Cha Tea Club Honey Oolong - brewed tea in a cup

Given that the leaves were only roasted once, there is little or no roasted flavor. But the transformation of chemical compounds that occurred in the leaves as a result of roasting is quite evident. In other words, this batch is very different from the original unroasted version. The results of a single roasting are mostly noticeable due to the effect of the Green Leafhopper as the leaves grew. And the nature of this effect is impossible to determine until the leaves are processed and then roasted afterwards.

Eco-Cha Tea Club Honey Oolong - Gongfu brewing

The extensive oxidation and minimal roasting offer a flavor profile that has the rich, density of Small Leaf Black Tea while still maintaining enough freshness to give it complexity and vibrancy. Sweet, ripe fruity notes balanced by mildly astringent nutty/woody tones. Add to this an unmistakeable honey essence in both the aroma and on the palate. It's a proper Oolong in its complexity, and a signature bug-bitten batch of tea.

Eco-Cha Tea Club Honey Oolong - brewed leaves

We look forward to hearing about your experience of this unique batch of tea that is being shared exclusively with the Eco-Cha Tea Club. Please post your comments, photos, and tasting videos here in the comments below for all of us to see!

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1 Response

Sean
Sean

August 29, 2018

This tea is, hands-down, the best bug-bitten tea I’ve ever had. There’s something lurking in the background that I can’t put my finger on, but I’m inclined to say it reminds me of a mix of caramel and vanilla. That’s in addition to the honey aspects! As a general rule, I am a big fan of bug-bitten teas, but this one, sigh, words elude me. It’s delicious!

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