Light Roast Phoenix Village Oolong Tasting Notes | Eco-Cha Tea Club

June 18, 2018

Eco-Cha Tea Club Light Roast Phoenix Village Oolong - brewed tea

The home of tradtionally made Taiwan Oolong Tea

Phoenix Village is located just above Dong Ding Mountain, and is home to the densest population of traditional tea artisans in Taiwan. Our friend's father, who is a recognized elder of this tradition, supervised the initial processing stages of this batch of tea.

Eco-Cha Tea Club Light Roast Phoenix Village Oolong -  tea leaves

The truth is, our favorite batches of traditionally made Taiwanese Oolongs have come from this community of family owned farms in the foothills of Phoenix Mountain in Lugu Township. We've been told it's the soil, and the mid-elevation climate that is most conducive to making a traditionally made Oolong Tea. But in our own perception, it's the expertise that comes from generations of tea making that results in the character of tea that we love the most.

Eco-Cha Tea Club Light Roast Phoenix Village Oolong -  Gongfu brewed tea

This batch of tea was processed as a traditional Dong Ding Oolong Tea. But when Grandpa Liu roasted it once, he decided that the flavor profile and overall character of tea offered something unique, so he wisely went no further. And so it is that we tasted a particularly impressive light roast Oolong Tea just in time to procure the remainder of this batch.

Eco-Cha Tea Club Light Roast Phoenix Village Oolong - brewed tea leaves

The aroma is strikingly reminiscent of fresh scones, cinnamon and brown sugar. The brewed tea offers a thick, smooth mouth feel, with notes of Swiss Chard sauteed in butter. Overall, is has a balanced, sweet and mildly astringent character, with pronounced buttery, brown sugar and savory dark green leafy vegetal qualities. In sum, it's the definition of satisfying! It has the clean, refreshing characteristics of any quality Oolong Tea, but it is so pleasant in its delivery! We find it to be simply delectable.

LET US KNOW!

We really want to know what you think! Leave your impressions or questions in the comment section below!

SUBSCRIBE!

If you enjoyed this post and would like to hear more about the specialty tea industry here in Taiwan, follow us on YouTubeFacebook, and Instagram and please subscribe to our newsletter. Subscribe now and get $5 off your first order!





Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in News

Roasted High Mountain Black Tea Tasting Notes | Eco-Cha Tea Club
Roasted High Mountain Black Tea Tasting Notes | Eco-Cha Tea Club

June 16, 2021

We continue to be captivated by the character of Batch 67 of the Eco-Cha Tea Club. From the appearance of these dried leaves above to the color of the brewed tea, and of course, most prominently — its flavor profile, it's a unique tea. This is what we most appreciate about the Club — finding something that we truly excited to share. The flavor of this tea is not something we can say we have had before. It really has a lot going on!

View full article →

Roasted High Mountain Black Tea | Eco-Cha Tea Club
Roasted High Mountain Black Tea | Eco-Cha Tea Club

June 16, 2021

Eco-Cha first met Mr. Zhan in 2016, when we smelled tea being roasted beside the historical train station in Shuili — one of our favorite mountain towns in central Taiwan. We learned that he had been transitioning his family tea farm to natural farming methods for several years already. We said that we looked forward to learning more about his work, and hoped to have the chance to procure some tea! Well, some things take time... and 5 years later, here we are — finally able to share a batch of his tea with the Eco-Cha Tea Club!

View full article →

Gateway to the Alishan High Mountain Tea growing region in Taiwan
Alishan High Mountain Jin Xuan Oolong Tea Sourcing (Summer 2021)

June 11, 2021

This year's second crop of Alishan High Mountain Jin Xuan Oolong began to be harvested last week, before rains that lasted several days. Then resumed earlier this week. We first visited our primary source of Alishan High Mountain Tea to taste their first two days of summer harvest. 

View full article →