Organic Wuyi Hongshui Oolong Tasting Notes | Eco-Cha Tea Club

September 06, 2016 1 Comment

As these leaves were slightly more mature than what is typically harvested for expedient processing and consistent quality, they were heavily oxidized, as was common in the region some 50 years ago. This involved about 24 hours of intermittent shuffling of the leaves by hand and allowing them to set for 1-3 hours at a time. In the last several hours, the leaves were put into a large bamboo tumbler to have more impact on the leaves with the goal of uniform and thorough oxidation. Following their exposure to high heat to cease the oxidation process, the leaves were rolled using the traditional method of a loosely bound cloth as opposed the tightly bound modern method. This traditional method of rolling and drying the tea leaves results in a wholly different profile of flavor and consistency. The effect is a rich, smooth texture with a complexity of flavor that exudes a character of handmade artisan tea.

This tea has a very traditionally cured flavor profile. It's soothing yet refreshingly satisfying at the same time. Something about the higher level of oxidation and the very lightly roasted aspect gives it a home-made dessert character, like peach cobbler. It has a tangy sweetness with an underlying hearty, rich aspect that makes it a very substantial, yet not overbearing brew. More and more, we find ourselves appreciating this traditional style of heavier oxidation and lighter roast level that offers a broader flavor profile and a complexity that continues to be intriguing and satisfying brew after brew.

This month's batch that we have to share with our Tea Club members continues to give us inspiration and confidence that we really are sharing something that can't be found on the market. By visiting the sources that we find most interesting and representative of specialty tea producers, we are able to share the fruits of their innovative efforts. This continually reminds us that we are doing something quite special. We are literally sharing our explorations of a world that never ceases to provide new and surprising gifts of knowledge about tea culture, and also unique batches of tea of course!





1 Response

Mark
Mark

September 17, 2016

Special indeed! This is the third tea I have received as a member of the tea club and all three have been among the most memorable teas I have ever tasted. Thanks so much for creating the tea club and sharing these very special teas….I am enjoying it immensely!

Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in News

Tea sourcing trip by motorcycle to the Alishan region of Taiwan
Alishan High Mountain Oolong Fall 2020 Tea Sourcing Trip

September 24, 2020

It was a beautiful morning, and although the sun was quite strong, it felt so good to be doing what we love most — riding into the hills to source quality Taiwanese Tea! We've ridden this rode at dozens of times over the last 20+ years, and it never gets old. Each time we take this trip, we see these mountains in a different light. As far as we recall, this is the first time we stopped at this awesome spot on this bridge!

View full article →

Hong Shui Oolong Tea
Traditional Hong Shui Oolong Tea Tasting Notes | Eco-Cha Tea Club

September 11, 2020

The full flavored character reflects the mastery that evolved from pre-modern tea producing methods — which our friend learned from his grandfather as a teenager. It's a rich, fruity, complex flavor profile with classic mineral notes, and a vibrant, truly satisfying finish. This, this is the real deal when it comes to traditionally made Oolong Tea from Nantou County, Taiwan!

View full article →

Grandma Chen maker of Traditional Hong Shui Oolong Tea
Traditional Hong Shui Oolong Tea | Eco-Cha Tea Club

September 07, 2020

Batch 58 of the Eco-Cha Tea Club is a Hong Shui Oolong made in the traditional fashion by our friend in his home factory in Phoenix Village, Taiwan. He let his family plot of tea behind their traditional 3-sided farmhouse continue to grow after spring harvest in April until the last few days in July. This allows the tea trees to rejuvenate by growing naturally during the most vegetative phase of their annual cycle. He then harvested just the tops of the new growth before pruning his trees for fall harvest.

View full article →