Tieguanyin Light Roast Oolong Tea Tasting Notes | Eco-Cha Tea Club

September 12, 2019 2 Comments

Beautiful Chinese Tea Set | Eco-Cha Teas

Batch #46 of the Eco-Cha Tea Club is a Tieguanyin Light Roast Oolong Tea from Yonglong Village in Lugu, Taiwan. The leaves were harvested in June from a plot of heirloom Tieguanyin tea plants. They were cured in the local traditional fashion of Oolong Tea making. The leaves are at least 40% oxidized, and were roasted for about 14 hours.

Dry Tieguanyin Tea Leaves | Eco-Cha Teas

The chunky nuggets of rolled and dried leaf show both their maturity and substance. This cultivar yields particularly thick leaf, which offers substantial composition in the brew. The significant oxidation and light roasting bring forth a rich, balanced, hearty character of tea.

Tieguanyin Tea Color | Eco-Cha Teas

The texture on the palate is exceptionally thick and and smooth. And the flavor profile is complex and multi-layered. Strong notes of freshly cut fruitwood, dried apricot, and toasted pecans are at the fore, followed by obvious mineral notes, and more subtle leather and tobacco undertones.

Oolong Tea Set | Eco-Cha Teas

Yeah, there's a lot to notice in this brew! It's clearly got a bitter floor, but there's so much happening on that floor that the bitterness holds it all together, and the finishes it off with a clean, lingering aftertaste. This batch is a fine example of the local artisanal Oolong Tea making culture. The raw material of the leaves is a rarity in central Taiwan, and the tea makers are in the heart of Oolong Country in Lugu, the home of Dong Ding Oolong Tea.

Wet tieguanyin tea leaves

We are very happy to be sharing this batch with the Tea Club this month, and look forward to hearing your experiences of it. Please leave comments and post photos here on this blog, and share our posts with your tea head friends!

SUBSCRIBE!

If you found this post useful and would like to hear more about the specialty tea industry here in Taiwan, follow us on YouTubeFacebook, and Instagram and please subscribe to our newsletter. Subscribe now and get $5 off your first order!





2 Responses

Jennifer Smith
Jennifer Smith

September 13, 2019

Can’t wait to try this tea. But I have to say that pot is so beautiful! Any chance you have some more to sell? : ) Thanks for your continued efforts!!!

jude johnsson
jude johnsson

September 13, 2019

What a gorgeous setting ! ! ! I would hang a picture of that, on my wall. Looking forward to tasting this months offering. Really, all the pictures are stunning.

Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in News

Tea sourcing trip by motorcycle to the Alishan region of Taiwan
Alishan High Mountain Oolong Fall 2020 Tea Sourcing Trip

September 24, 2020

It was a beautiful morning, and although the sun was quite strong, it felt so good to be doing what we love most — riding into the hills to source quality Taiwanese Tea! We've ridden this rode at dozens of times over the last 20+ years, and it never gets old. Each time we take this trip, we see these mountains in a different light. As far as we recall, this is the first time we stopped at this awesome spot on this bridge!

View full article →

Hong Shui Oolong Tea
Traditional Hong Shui Oolong Tea Tasting Notes | Eco-Cha Tea Club

September 11, 2020

The full flavored character reflects the mastery that evolved from pre-modern tea producing methods — which our friend learned from his grandfather as a teenager. It's a rich, fruity, complex flavor profile with classic mineral notes, and a vibrant, truly satisfying finish. This, this is the real deal when it comes to traditionally made Oolong Tea from Nantou County, Taiwan!

View full article →

Grandma Chen maker of Traditional Hong Shui Oolong Tea
Traditional Hong Shui Oolong Tea | Eco-Cha Tea Club

September 07, 2020

Batch 58 of the Eco-Cha Tea Club is a Hong Shui Oolong made in the traditional fashion by our friend in his home factory in Phoenix Village, Taiwan. He let his family plot of tea behind their traditional 3-sided farmhouse continue to grow after spring harvest in April until the last few days in July. This allows the tea trees to rejuvenate by growing naturally during the most vegetative phase of their annual cycle. He then harvested just the tops of the new growth before pruning his trees for fall harvest.

View full article →