Eco-Farmed High Mountain Oolong Tea | Eco-Cha Tea Club Tasting Notes

October 10, 2020 1 Comment

Eco-Farmed Yushan High Mountain Oolong Tea Dried Leaves | Eco-Cha Tea Club

Batch 59 of the Eco-Cha Tea Club is an Eco-Farmed High Mountain Oolong Tea sourced from the same farmer as batch 51, but from a different plot of tea. This month's batch is from their primary farm, where they grow artichokes, coffee, and fruit, as well as an ongoing variety of vegetables for their own consumption. It's at a slightly lower elevation than the plot from where Batch 59 was harvested, but it is more remote and further up the main river valley that leads to the Yushan Mountain range. The majority of tea trees on this farm appear to have adjusted more successfully to organic living than their higher elevation cousins.

Eco-Farmed Yushan High Mountain Oolong Tea Gong Fu Brew

This crop of tea is the most recent growth picked from new branches on the trees that were allowed to grow for four months or so, similar to our recent batch of Traditional Hong Shui Oolong that we offered last month. As with last month's batch, this tea was also affected by the Green Leafhopper, and other pests. This is inevitable, given that this is an organic farm and the summer months are most susceptible to bugs!

The most obvious difference between last month's batch and this month's is in the processing methods. This batch of tea that was harvested at 500m higher elevation, and in a much more remote mountainous region, was processed similarly to a High Mountain Tea, but with a bit more oxidation. The oxidation level is the result of more outdoor and indoor withering, as well as shuffling of the leaves. These leaves require this extra manipulation due to their natural "toughness" as a result of not being the tender new growth immediately following a previous harvest or pruning.

Eco-Farmed Yushan High Mountain Oolong Tea brewed tea in a cup

What these leaves have to offer as a result of the relatively slow, natural growing phase is their substance. They simply have a lot more constitution. So while they do not offer the fresh, fragrant, and delicate profile of a standard High Mountain Oolong when brewed, they have much more composition. And this composition brews slowly and steadily, with significantly more endurance. We suggest a 1:16 ratio of leaf to water. We used about 12g of tea in the above 200mL gaiwan style teapot.

It starts off with a warming spices/mild savory aroma, and brews a smooth, thick texture, with floral, honey, and tangy notes, and ends with a balanced, sweet/dry, lasting finish. It brews steadily and consistently for several brews. Don't be surprised if the first and second brew are a bit timid. These leaves take a bit of steeping to open up. But those first brews offer their own special introduction into the character of these leaves. The lighter more subtle notes are revealed before the more substantial constitution issues forth.

Eco-Farmed Yushan High Mountain Oolong Tea | Eco-Cha Tea Club

These leaves were baked at low temperature (80*C) for three separate intervals of six hours each — for a total of 18 hours. While this doesn't really qualify as "roasting", it has a significant effect on the flavor profile in terms of transforming any green, grassy character into a more mild, sweeter, pastry-like flavor profile. It also ensures that any remaining moisture in the leaves, and especially stems is removed, which in effect cures the leaves. This means that the flavor profile and nature of the leaves is much more stable, and able to maintain their character over time. Watch the tasting video for the full review!

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1 Response

Paul
Paul

October 21, 2020

I rarely comment, but this is very, very nice.

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