Light Roast Yushan High Mountain Oolong Tea Tasting Notes

February 05, 2020 1 Comment

Light Roast Yushan High Mountain Oolong Tea dry leaf

The chunky nuggets of dried leaf shown above are the winter produce from an isolated organic farm in Dongpu, the northern trailhead for Taiwan's highest peak —Yushan, or Jade Mountain. The leaves were significantly oxidized, making them suitable for the light roasting that was done by an elder Oolong Tea master in Lugu.

Light Roast Yushan High Mountain Oolong Tea brewed tea in a cup

The leaves brew an exceptionally substantial, smooth, balanced tea with a very satisfying savory/sweet profile. The brewed leaves put forth fresh, buttery green leafy aromatic notes, like sauteed Swiss Chard. The tea is viscous, with an evenly balanced complexity of warming spices and unrefined sugary notes — cardamom, palm sugar, and butternut squash come to mind.

Light Roast Yushan High Mountain Oolong Tea brewed tea leaves

Both the richly sweet flavor profile of the lightly roasted leaves and the slightly yellow hued appearance of the brewed leaves are signs of the Green Leafhopper. And given that the second half of the winter growing season had no rain, and temperatures remained warm, it's likely the leaves were "bug-bitten" on this organic farm, and the constituents in the leaves remained until harvest. 

Light Roast Yushan High Mountain Oolong Tea cha xi

It's an amazingly balanced composition that can withstand concentrated brews. But we recommend starting a bit light on the leaf:water ratio to capture the more subtle aromatic and flavor notes. You can always brew stronger later, we like to remind ourselves!

This batch of tea is special due to the microclimate high up in a remote mountain gorge, and the fact that it is organically cultivated with no other farming in the vicinity. It was also roasted by our favorite traditional Oolong Tea master — because we wanted this singular batch of organic winter harvest to receive the treatment it deserved!

We look forward to hearing about your experience of this batch of tea being shared in the first month of the Lunar New Year. And be sure to put up your red door paper for posperity and good luck!

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1 Response

Yen
Yen

February 15, 2020

Just wondering if there’s any taste difference between the light roasting and the unroasted version?

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