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Da Yu Ling High Mountain Oolong Tea

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  • Flavor: Mildly sweet, bold foresty aroma. Rich, smooth, fresh and vibrant character. Heady, fruity aftertaste.

    Garden:  This garden is located at the 97 km marker of Taiwan's Cross-Central Highway. It is one of the few remaining tea gardens in this remote, highest elevation area.

    Harvest:  Hand-picked, medium batch, Heping, Taiwan. Spring 2018.

    Elevation: 2200m

  • The place name Da Yu Ling is unsurpassed for premium Taiwan High Mountain Oolong, and we feel privileged to be able to share this tea, which has become rare in recent years. Spring tea from this region is richly complex, with a heady, seemingly endless bouquet. This batch offers a balanced character with subtle aromatic qualities that provide intrigue and satisfaction with each sip!

  • The Story Of This Tea

    The highest elevation tea growing regions are widely acknowledged as the epitome High Mountain Oolong Tea production.. The ideal climate conditions offered by this elevation combined with the methods of tea cultivation that have been developed are considered to be the main factors that have gained this category of tea its fame.

    This is a rare batch of Da Yu Ling High Mountain Tea in that the level of oxidation exceeds the commonly produced tea in this region at highest elevation. The difference between the standard 10-15% level of oxidation and the less commonly produced 20-25% is that the light, floral, green character is transformed into a more fruity, substantial, smooth character of High Mountain Oolong.

    Our friend, who shares his stock of Da Yu Ling Tea with us, has cooperated with the farmer of this tea garden for 20 years. He has continuously procured entire harvests every season, and has advised the farmer in the use of fertilizers with the purpose of producing the highest quality possible. He is the only person we know in the industry who is of the conviction of using whole soy beans for fertilizer, instead of commercial fertilizer containing the by-product of producing soy oil, and other soy-based products.

    Most of the tea gardens in the Da Yu LIng region have been removed by the national Forestry Dept. that only in recent years has begun enforcing land use laws. This farm was reduced by 1/3 of its overall area in 2014 for the same reason. And it is only due to the long-standing relationship our friend has with this farmer that we are able to source this tea which is basically sold out before it is harvested each season.




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