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Sourcing tea in Taiwan for 22 years, we visit farmers on their land and in their homes almost daily in order to understand completely the tea we're putting in our—and in your—cups.

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Oolong tea from family run farms that use sustainable methods. Naturally farmed and responsibly sourced. 




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News

Rebirth Of An Organic Tea Farm

January, 13, 2017

The farm is now moving into its third year of a newly planted crop, and is just beginning to yield a harvest. Rocky has a lot of work ahead of him, but we are all confident that this new generation with a new scientific approach to farming as well as a small but growing network of farmers to share experience with, that he will succeed in his efforts. I will be sure to keep in closer contact with Rocky and hopefully Eco-Cha will have a chance to share the tea from this farm that was brought back to life!

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Eco-Cha Tea Club: Longan Charcoal Roasted Oolong Tea Tasting Notes

January, 7, 2017

The leaves shown above were harvested in the Shanlinxi High Mountain Tea growing region last spring, and have undergone 8 separate roasting sessions. The first three preliminary roastings were done in a conventional oven in preparation for the traditional method of using charcoal made from the Longan fruitwood. 

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Eco-Cha Tea Club: Longan Charcoal Roasted Oolong Tea

January, 5, 2017

These leaves have undergone 8 separate roastings over a few months, for a total roasting time of about 50 hours. Our friend first prepared his tea leaves for charcoal roasting by roasting them 3 times in a conventional oven roaster at low temperature of 80 -100°C. This provides a "base" roasting level that the charcoal roasting can proceed from more efficiently. The leaves were then handed over to a specialized charcoal roaster who charges a standard fee, regardless of how many roastings are needed to achieve the desired results. In this case, it was 5 roasting sessions of incrementally increasing heat, starting from about 90° and finishing at 120°.

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