Spring Harvest 2014 Report #1 - Winter into Spring

April 03, 2014 0 Comments

The weather this spring started out cold and dry – basically an extended winter season. This delayed the growing season of spring tea, particularly at higher elevations and in more northern areas. The extended winter conditions are mostly seen as positive - allowing the plants to “hibernate” or remain in their dormant phase. In the last couple weeks spring weather has arrived with warmer temperatures and frequent rainfall. If it continues this way, and does not proceed to rain too much or too little, prospects are looking good – especially for higher elevation areas.

State of growth as of Sunday March 30, 2014 in Lugu Township, Nantou Taiwan. 600m. 






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