Spring Harvest 2014 Report #2 - Mid-Harvest

April 07, 2014

Lower elevation areas (Mingjian, Nantou) and southern areas (Meishan, Chiayi) have already been harvesting for the last 2-3 weeks. The machine harvested low elevation teas have produced an unusually low-volume yield due to the late spring. With machine harvesting, it is necessary to harvest the top (first) growth off the bush before it becomes too mature. The plants responded to the early weather conditions by growing a bit erratically, in clumps of growth spurts rather than more evenly distributed across the surface. Hence, the yield was low. Perhaps the late spring harvest to follow will be more normal, and probably less than two months from now.

 





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