Spring Harvest 2014 Report #6 - The Weather's Fine As Harvest Climbs!

April 18, 2014

The weather this spring continues to be ideal during harvest season. Almost no rain has allowed farmers to remain on schedule and not have to postpone the timing of their harvest. We are crossing our fingers that it will hold out as the elevation of harvest locations continues to climb. In Southern Nantou County, harvest has reached 1200-1400m, although some of our friends at 700-800m in this area have yet to pick and process their spring leaves. The cold and dry start to the growing season has affected varying micro-climates differently. Stay tuned for more detailed harvest reports from Taiwan...

Harvest photos taken Friday April 18th, 2014 in Shan Lin Xi by 李明正. 

X

 





Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in News

Does Tea Go Bad?
Does Tea Go Bad?

September 15, 2019

The shelf life of tea is a common topic of discussion among tea drinkers. We often see questions such as:

  • Can tea go bad?
  • How do I keep my loose leaf tea fresh?
  • Which teas have longer or shorter shelf lives?

Let's look at some of the factors that affect how long your tea stays fresh.

View full article →

Loose leaf tea on a table with a cup
How to Store Loose Leaf Tea (2019 Update)

September 14, 2019 2 Comments

Loose leaf tea is a great way to enjoy tea, but there are some important things to keep in mind when storing it. Where and how you store it can have a great effect on how your final brew tastes. Read on to learn about the five most important things to keep your loose leaf tea fresh and as long lasting as possible.

View full article →

Eco-Cha Tea Club: Tieguanyin Light Roast Oolong Tea Tasting Notes
Eco-Cha Tea Club: Tieguanyin Light Roast Oolong Tea Tasting Notes

September 12, 2019 2 Comments

Batch #46 of the Eco-Cha Tea Club is a Tieguanyin Light Roast Oolong Tea from Yonglong Village in Lugu, Taiwan. The leaves were harvested in June from a plot of heirloom Tieguanyin tea plants. They were cured in the local traditional fashion of Oolong Tea making. The leaves are at least 40% oxidized, and were roasted for about 14 hours.

View full article →