Spring Harvest 2014 Report #6 - The Weather's Fine As Harvest Climbs!

April 19, 2014

The weather this spring continues to be ideal during harvest season. Almost no rain has allowed farmers to remain on schedule and not have to postpone the timing of their harvest. We are crossing our fingers that it will hold out as the elevation of harvest locations continues to climb. In Southern Nantou County, harvest has reached 1200-1400m, although some of our friends at 700-800m in this area have yet to pick and process their spring leaves. The cold and dry start to the growing season has affected varying micro-climates differently. Stay tuned for more detailed harvest reports from Taiwan...

Harvest photos taken Friday April 18th, 2014 in Shan Lin Xi by 李明正. 

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