Free global shipping on orders $35 or more!

Lugu Farmers' Association Dong Ding Oolong Spring Tea Competition 2014 - Tea Fair and Tasting

June 05, 2014

Last Saturday was the spring competition tea fair, when prizes are publicly awarded and competition teas can be sampled and purchased.

Here is a bird's eye view of the event at the Lugu Farmers' Association with a glimpse of the historical Dong Ding Mountain in the background.

In addition to the awards ceremony and tea fair, there was the cultural element of tea and music offered to the public free of charge.

To finalize the event, on the following Wednesday there was an unpublicized occasion provided by the Farmers' Association for local participants in the competition and a few select guests to sample the spectrum of this spring's competition teas. I attended it with my friend Patricia Zhu - principal of Lugu Junior High School.

The teas were displayed to provide an educational experience of the judging process. First in the line were samples of rejected entries based on various characteristics such as green, bitter, astringent, aged, muddled, overly-roasted, etc. These were followed by entries that received awards in the competition - starting with the lowest and progressing to the champion prize winning tea.

These categories include two plum blossoms (about 34% of all entries); three plum blossoms (about 20%); Third Class (about 9%); Second Class (about 5%); First Class (about 2%); Top Ten Winners; and Champion Prize. There were a total of 5,882 entries in this spring's competition. Within the categories below the top ten and champion prize, three samples of each category were offered to represent the accepted roasting spectrum of the teas. This allows competitors to get a direct experience of the teas judged on a very pivotal factor in their production - roasting. This opportunity to taste the judging standards is essential information for artisans to experience in their preparation for the world's largest oolong tea competition.





Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in News

Eco-Cha Tea Club: Red Oolong Tasting Notes
Eco-Cha Tea Club: Red Oolong Tasting Notes

December 07, 2018

Appearance of the dried leaves is the first step in assessing any loose leaf tea. We can see by the coloration that these leaves are partially oxidized, with both green hues and darker tones. This is the first sign that it is a traditionally made Oolong tea. In recent trends, tea made in this fashion has been given the name "hong Oolong" or Red Oolong. It's actually just a new name for an old recipe.

View full article →

Eco-Cha Tea Club: Red Oolong Tea
Eco-Cha Tea Club: Red Oolong Tea

December 03, 2018

This is what inspired us to share this batch of tea that was produced in Nantou County. We consider this batch of tea to be properly named Red Oolong, simply because the leaves are obviously only partially oxidized. The flavor of the tea has aspects of a Black Tea character while maintaining the fragrant, aromatic complexity of an Oolong.

View full article →

The Science of How Tea Can Prolong Our Lifespan
The Science of How Tea Can Prolong Our Lifespan

November 25, 2018

Drinking tea can actually help protect the health of our DNA, which can prolong our lives. Research has shown that a healthy habit of tea drinking may extend our lives up to five years! 
 
A large group of older Chinese men who drank 3 cups or more of tea daily recorded longer telomere lengths, and almost five years of added life, compared with people who drank one cup or less. The study, published in the British Journal of Nutrition, applies to green and black tea.

View full article →