FREE GLOBAL SHIPPING ON ORDERS $35 OR MORE.

Inaugural Organic Harvest: Oolong Tea Roasting Process - Part Two

November 20, 2014

So here we are, in the final phase of processing the first harvest of certified organic tea from Mr. and Mrs. Lin's new farm! Here is Mrs. Lin destemming the last bit of tea before the second half of the batch is roasted for a second time.

Most oolong tea artisans agree that the most subtle and unpredictable aspect of making tea is in the roasting process. Mr. Lin is now in the process of getting to know the produce from his new crop of a new varietal of tea - Tai Cha #20. In determining how to go about roasting tea leaves, the artisan takes into account the entire process, beginning with the condition of the leaves while they are still on the bush, and the way they were cured, and how they brew after the initial processing is completed.

Here's a snapshot of Nick and Andy previewing the footage that their videographer friend Sean just shot of Mr. Lin putting the second batch in the oven to be used in our upcoming documentary of this entire event.

With the intention of producing both a light roast and a heavier roast from this harvest, two separate approaches were taken. Basically, the temperature of roasting was varied at the beginning of the roasting process and continued to be monitored and adjusted as the leaves are brewed throughout the roasting process. He we are, tasting both versions of the tea after two roastings of each, to determine which will be left as a light roast and which will undergo further roasting to produce a more traditional, heavier roasted oolong.


 

After draining bowls of brewed tea as we tasted them again and again, we decided to take samples of each home and examine the brews a few more times before making a decision. This weekend a choice will be made, and the final step will be taken in producing a more roasted version of this tea, while keeping the lighter one as is. Both are tasting very nice, it's simply a judgment call about which one is optimal for another round of roasting, or maybe even two!

We are anxiously looking forward to packaging up both light and heavy roasts to send of to all of our backers who supported this campaign. Thanks again to all of you who have supported us and followed us on our journey!





Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in News

Eco-Cha Tea Club: Honey Oolong Tea Tasting Notes
Eco-Cha Tea Club: Honey Oolong Tea Tasting Notes

August 12, 2018

The extensive oxidation and minimal roasting offer a flavor profile that has the rich, density of Small Leaf Black Tea while still maintaining enough freshness to give it complexity and vibrancy. Sweet, ripe fruity notes balanced by mildly astringent nutty/woody tones. Add to this an unmistakeable honey essence in both the aroma and on the palate. It's a proper Oolong in its complexity, and a signature bug-bitten batch of tea.

View full article →

Eco-Cha Tea Club: Honey Oolong Tea
Eco-Cha Tea Club: Honey Oolong Tea

August 07, 2018

A mom, dad, and son team manage their small family farm and process their crops on their own. And the recent spring harvest offered the pleasant surprise of one day's harvest turning out to be Honey Oolong. This name is properly used when the flavor of the tea has a distinct honey character that results from the Green Leafhopper working its magic. The Leafhopper (jacobiasca formosana) is a tiny green bug that likes to feed on the sap of the tender new leaf buds.

View full article →

Harvesting Loose-Leaf Tea: Machine-Clipped VS. Hand-Picked
Harvesting Loose-Leaf Tea: Machine-Clipped VS. Hand-Picked

August 04, 2018

As the specialty tea industry rapidly gains popularity around the world, topics like this one are increasingly mentioned in blogposts, newsfeeds, and on social media platforms. Unfortunately, this type of commentary is mostly hearsay, and lacks objectivity. It was just such a post that recently prompted us to offer a more thorough perspective from the industry here in Taiwan.

View full article →