Inaugural Dong Ding Tea Making Workshop In Phoenix Village

September 24, 2016

The Yonglong Fenghuang Community recently conducted its inaugural local workshop emulating the Lugu Farmers' Association's model of a Traditional Dong Ding Oolong Tea making practicum. This community is the historical heart of Dong Ding Oolong Country. It is where this specialty tea originated and continues to represent the most traditional methods of Dong Ding Oolong tea making.

This community also conducts their own local tea competition in an effort to preserve its claim to being the roots of traditional Dong Ding Tea. This competition is also directly modeled after the Lugu Farmers' Association tea competition, which has set the precedent for all tea competitions in Taiwan and beyond. The Yonglong Fenghuang Community competition's quality standard however is closer to the traditional style of Dong Ding Oolong. This is what has inspired this community to conduct this workshop — to educate its residents on how to achieve this quality and character of Traditional Dong Ding Oolong Tea.

Eco-Cha sees these traditional tea making workshops as the most substantial evidence of the revival and preservation of traditional tea making in Taiwan. In effect, the Lugu Farmers' Association is leading the way in counteracting the large scale promotion and production of Oolong Tea's modern incarnation as High Mountain Tea in recent decades.

The above photo shows the process of "tumbling the tea leaves in action". This is toward the end of the indoor withering and oxidation phase of the tea leaves, after the initial phase of solar withering shown in the photos above.

In traditional tea making, the phases of processing the tea leaves are determined by the appearance and aroma of the tea leaves without the use of heaters, fans, air-con, and preset timers. This stands in contrast to the standardized procedure that virtually all modern production of High Mountain Tea entails.

When the desired degree of moisture depletion and oxidation of the leaves is attained, they are put into high temperature tumble dryers to cease the oxidation process by killing the live enzymes in the leaves and remove the moisture from the leaves in a much more rapid and substantial manner. After this, the leaves undergo primary rolling and drying before they are left to set overnight. The following day the leaves are intermittently rolled and dried into tightly rolled nuggets to prevent crumbling and preserve freshness. We felt privileged to attend both of these workshops this month that give us renewed hope in the preservation of a world class traditional specialty tea.

Outdoor photos courtesy of 林凌霄.





Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in News

Traditional Dong Ding Oolong Leaves
Traditional Dong Ding Oolong Tea

November 22, 2020

We are very happy to finally be able to offer the pre-modern version of Dong Ding Oolong Tea! We've waited for years to source this local traditional specialty from our friend who simply has more demand than supply from his family plot of tea in Phoenix Village in Lugu Township, Taiwan. 

View full article →

Eco-Farmed Special Roast Oolong Tea dry leaves
Eco-Farmed Specialty Roast Oolong Tea Tasting Notes| Eco-Cha Tea Club

November 16, 2020 1 Comment

Batch 60 of the Eco-Cha Tea Club brings us to a full five years of offering monthly editions of specialty Taiwanese teas! This month's edition was cultivated and crafted by one of our most respected sources of naturally farmed tea. He not only employs the most radical natural farming methods we know of, he also is continually refining processing methods to bring his produce to its fullest potential, based on the growing conditions of each season. Mr. Xie also produces our GABA Oolong Tea, which, like this month's batch, is one of his signature products.

View full article →

Eco-Farmed Special Roast Oolong Tea farm
Eco-Farmed Specialty Roast Oolong Tea | Eco-Cha Tea Club

November 16, 2020

This batch of tea was harvested last spring, and processed as a medium oxidized Oolong. The stems were then removed in preparation for extensive roasting. Mr. Xie proceeded to roast these leaves four times in total. The first roasting was done in the standard convection type oven to remove all remaining moisture from the leaves. The following 3 roastings were done in an oven designed for roasting coffee beans! 

View full article →