Roasted Qing Xin Oolong Black Tea | Double Ten Day Special!

October 09, 2019 3 Comments

Happy Double Ten Day from Taiwan! 

This batch of tea was originally our February 2019 edition of the Eco-Cha Tea Club. And now, the minimal remainder of that batch of Qing Xin Oolong Black Tea has undergone a delicate roasting, offering "another side" of its character. 



Our friend decided to take the opportunity of using the remaining 5kg or so of Black Tea to experiment in roasting a batch of tightly rolled leaves that were processed as Black Tea, but also included Oolong Tea making methods. In a word, it's a unique combination of Oolong and Black Tea processing that we not only found interesting, but also delicious! To our knowledge, there are very few versions of roasted Black Tea offered in Taiwan.

The roasted version is what you might expect — a more "cured" version of Black Tea that offers a more refined, subtle flavor profile, almost like an aged tea, but maintaining a complex vitality that is unique in our experience. What originally was a very thick, fruit compote character is now more of a dried fruit flavor, with a lot of endurance and an amazing condensed sweet/dry and heady profile. It starts out as a full bodied brew with notes of mild citrus, like pomelo, yet dense enough to be reminiscent of a pluot. It then proceeds to get sweeter as you brew, with the later brews being uncannily reminiscent of dried apricots.

Our friend Mr. Chen is a true local artisan of traditionally made Oolong Tea, as well as being a professional tea judge for more than 20 years at the Lugu Farmers' Association Tea Competition. This is the largest and most prestigious Oolong Tea competition in the world. He is a professional farmer, artisan Oolong craftsman, and an international representative of Taiwanese Tea.

In sum, we're pretty excited to offer this minimal amount of tea that we discovered only a few weeks ago. There is such a small amount that it is only appropriate to share as a holiday special. 

Happy 10/10 Day Tea Lovers!!

 





3 Responses

Eco-Cha Teas
Eco-Cha Teas

October 28, 2019

Kristen, This batch of tea was a form of research for our friend who made it. He had not roasted black tea before. Given our enthusiasm, he may do it again, but not sure when! So you might want to get some more of this batch of while it lasts Happy brewing!

Kristen Morgan
Kristen Morgan

October 28, 2019

There’s no chance this tea will ever be duplicated, is there? It’s phenomenal. It’s like apple pie and fall leaves in a cup.

Yen
Yen

October 28, 2019

This is a very unusual but delicious black tea! Bought it the moment it was offered and just made a brew to taste. Highly recommend for black tea lovers to try out a very special tea,

Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in News

Hong Shui Oolong Tea
Traditional Hong Shui Oolong Tea Tasting Notes | Eco-Cha Tea Club

September 11, 2020

The full flavored character reflects the mastery that evolved from pre-modern tea producing methods — which our friend learned from his grandfather as a teenager. It's a rich, fruity, complex flavor profile with classic mineral notes, and a vibrant, truly satisfying finish. This, this is the real deal when it comes to traditionally made Oolong Tea from Nantou County, Taiwan!

View full article →

Grandma Chen maker of Traditional Hong Shui Oolong Tea
Traditional Hong Shui Oolong Tea | Eco-Cha Tea Club

September 07, 2020

Batch 58 of the Eco-Cha Tea Club is a Hong Shui Oolong made in the traditional fashion by our friend in his home factory in Phoenix Village, Taiwan. He let his family plot of tea behind their traditional 3-sided farmhouse continue to grow after spring harvest in April until the last few days in July. This allows the tea trees to rejuvenate by growing naturally during the most vegetative phase of their annual cycle. He then harvested just the tops of the new growth before pruning his trees for fall harvest.

View full article →

Shan Lin Xi High Mountain Oolong Fall harvest
Shan Lin Xi High Mountain Oolong Fall 2020

September 02, 2020

In the end, each seasonal crop has its own unique combination of contributing factors that give it a slightly different aromatic and flavor profile than other seasons. We really enjoy experiencing these seasonal variations from the same plot of tea processed in the same basic way. We encourage our High Mountain Oolong fans to follow suit in order to more fully understand this type of tea and how it can vary from season to season. 

View full article →