Summer Harvest Of High Mountain Tea: The Sustainable Choice

July 29, 2016 0 Comments

We are happy to announce the arrival of this year's summer harvest of Shan Lin Xi High Mountain Oolong. Only since last year have we begun to offer the summer harvest from this source of high mountain tea, and we did so for a few specific reasons. First of all, it's considerably cheaper than spring and winter harvests, and while there is a noticeable difference in quality and character, it's still a fine high mountain tea. And for the price, it's a great deal!

It is generally acknowledged that a difference in quality between spring and summer/fall crops of tea is more noticeable at lower elevations. The higher the elevation, the less difference in quality. Starting as low as 1300m, there can be minimal seasonal differences, depending on the source. We have also discovered that it depends on the skill and patience of the tea maker to produce a quality tea from a summer or fall harvest. It requires more oxidization of the tea leaves to counteract the tendency to be astringent due to hotter weather in these growing seasons. And since we have begun sourcing from one of the most sought after producers on the local scene, we've been convinced that summer and fall crops are definitely worth representing.



The significant price difference between the primary spring/winter teas and secondary summer/fall harvests is a result of marketing trends in Taiwan over the last few decades, which has influenced  supply and demand, in addition to the seasonal differences in character and quality of the tea produced. The local industry has promoted spring tea as the most popular for both product quality and cultural reasons, and winter tea is in even higher demand due to its traditionally distinct character, it's relatively minimal seasonal yield (especially at higher elevations), and the proximity between this harvest and Chinese New Year — the biggest gift-giving time of the year.


We have found summer and fall harvests to be quite nice teas, and from a sustainability perspective, the preferred choice. There is less demand in the local industry, and the economic value of these crops is actually underrated in comparison to spring and winter seasons. Beyond this, it's yet another opportunity to gain deeper knowledge of the local specialty tea industry. Experiencing the subtle yet noticeable seasonal differences produced from the same farm allow us to appreciate this unique tea culture in a more substantial way.


So let us know what you think of this crop of summer tea, particularly if you were fortunate enough to get some of our spring crop that has just sold out! It really is a fun and meaningful experience to follow and compare the different characters of each seasonal batch. And before you know it, we'll have some fall tea to share with you some time in September.






Also in News

Eco-Farmed High Mountain Oolong | Summer 2021 Harvest
Eco-Farmed High Mountain Oolong | Summer 2021 Harvest

August 03, 2021 0 Comments

We have become close friends, and this is a unique connection in our 25 years of involvement with tea producers in the local Taiwan tea industry. This farm is a rare resource, given its environment and micro-climate. The owners have faced many challenges and only in the last few years have developed their organic farming to a stable situation. Now, with some support and guidance, we believe they will soon be producing some of the best organic tea in Taiwan!

View full article →

Shan Lin Xi High Mountain Oolong Summer Harvest
Shan Lin Xi High Mountain Oolong Summer Harvest

July 20, 2021 0 Comments

We brewed our spring batch of Shan Lin Xi High Mountain Oolong Tea alongside the freshly picked summer batch to observe the differences between these two consecutive harvests from the same source. These two batches exhibited the classic seasonal traits of spring and summer high mountain tea.

View full article →

Icy cold glass of iced tea made from Taiwan loose leaf tea
Flavor Your Iced Tea

July 15, 2021 0 Comments

While pure iced teas made from quality Taiwan loose leaf tea are amazingly satisfying and refreshing on their own, sometimes it's also nice to mix it up with some natural flavorings. Here are some suggestions on how to flavor iced teas for an added kick.

View full article →