FREE GLOBAL SHIPPING ON ORDERS OVER $75

Geographical Indicators For Taiwanese Tea

August 09, 2016

A meaningful article was recently published on the World of Tea site about the challenges of verifying the authenticity of tea via the use of geographical indicators. The author made a valid point about how the methods of employing geographical indicators are not foolproof, particularly when tea is exported outside of its local industry and market. His article prompted us to research geographical indicators here in Taiwan, which we have observed the development of over the last decade or so, but have not been directly involved in the use of them. Here's what the indicators look like on packaged tea:

Eco-Cha believes that our commitment to transparently representing the local industry here in Taiwan is actually more effective and trustworthy than this standardized method of verification. However, we were impressed by the standard methods of verification that are employed here in Taiwan, which we will briefly explain here.

Geographic indicators are managed by local governments who register a product and place name with the national Intellectual Property Office and cooperate with the Tea Research and Extension Station (TRES), a subsidiary of the Dept. of Agriculture. When tea producers register their farm and produce for the use of geographic indicators, the local government inspects the farm to verify the quantity of tea that can be produced from a given farm, primarily determined by the size of the farm. This step alone is perhaps the most effective in the overall process, as it regulates the authenticity of a regional product by knowing how much tea a registered farm can produce seasonally.

A sample of tea from each seasonal harvest is tested for chemical trace residue of pesticides to ensure that it is responsibly produced and passes European/North American export standards. This also helps to prevent the use of imported tea from less regulated origin. A separate sample of each harvest is sent to the TRES to be inspected for quality and processing methods to ensure that it meets the standard for a given tea type. For example, a batch of tea receiving authorized geographic indication for Dong Ding Oolong must be Qing Xin Oolong tea leaves that are sufficiently oxidized and roasted, and of a quality and character that represents this regional product. If the samples of tea are approved, the government will apply stickers to the approved batch of tea after it has been packaged for sale.

Primarily these geographic indicators are used by farmers' associations in tea producing regions to market their local specialty tea. The farmers' association is a trusted source that the tea represents the local produce. Beyond this, many tea farmers who produce tea in large quantities and aspire to market their own brand have determined it worthwhile to invest in this government certification. In recent years, of the hundreds of vendors at the Nantou County Global Tea Expo, a significant percentage of the privately branded tea for sale had certified geographic indicators on their packaging.

In the final analysis, there is no way to prove that tea leaves packaged with certified geographic indicators are indeed from the farm that is registered. But it is highly unlikely that a private brand will take the risk and the trouble to use tea from another source. There simply is no good reason to do so. Having said that, as the article on the World of Tea site stated, Taiwan has not yet made use of the geographic indicators on the international market. It appears to be for domestic use, or at least for the Chinese literate population, which includes China and Japan — a considerable portion of the consumer demand for Taiwanese tea. Below are all of the geographic indicators currently in use in Taiwan, starting in the north and going south.

 

文山包種茶及圖 WENSHAN BAO-CHUNG TEA

北埔鄉公所膨風茶產地證明標章 

台灣.新竹.峨眉鄉公所產地證明標章 Taiwan.HsinChu.Emei Township Office

苗栗縣東方美人茶產地證明標章 Miaoli Country 及圖

產地證明標章-合歡山高冷茶 Mt. HeHuan High Mountain tea 及圖

日月潭紅茶 Sun Moon Lake Black Tea 及圖

南投縣鹿谷鄉公所凍頂烏龍茶認證標章

杉林溪茶產地證明標章

嘉義縣政府阿里山高山茶標章

台灣.台東.鹿野.紅烏龍 Red Oolong Tea 及圖

臺東紅烏龍茶TEA及圖





Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in News

Eco-Cha Behind The Scenes Of The World's Largest Oolong Tea Competition
Eco-Cha Behind The Scenes Of The World's Largest Oolong Tea Competition

December 13, 2017

Shown above are bamboo basket roasters in full effect, emitting exquisite aromas of tea leaves in their last hours of roasting in preparation for the Lugu Farmers' Association's Dong Ding Oolong Tea Competition — winter 2017. These traditional style roasters are often used for the final roasting, following repeated roastings in larger convection ovens.

View full article →

Eco-Cha Tea Club: High Mountain Hong Shui Oolong Tea Tasting Notes
Eco-Cha Tea Club: High Mountain Hong Shui Oolong Tea Tasting Notes

December 08, 2017

This month's batch of tea being shared with the Eco-Cha Tea Club is a heavily oxidized, unroasted Oolong Tea harvested from the lower lying slopes of the Shanlinxi region. The character of this tea is an intriguing combination of Oolong and Black Tea. The aromatic qualities offer a rich sweet profile like fruit compote. On the palate, it has a broad range of flavor, with a base of deep musky notes into a complex fruity body with subtle hints of citrus in the finish. The aftertaste lingers with a dry headiness comprised of interesting sweet/tart and astringent tones.

View full article →

Eco-Cha Tea Club: High Mountain Hong Shui Oolong Tea
Eco-Cha Tea Club: High Mountain Hong Shui Oolong Tea

December 04, 2017

This month's batch of tea being shared with the Eco-Cha Tea Club is truly a unique find that came to us only via our dear friend and teacher. We met him about 20 years ago, and only in recent years have begun to call upon his expertise and deep roots in the local industry. After decades of managing his family farm and apprenticing under local masters, he has simplified his position by renting out his factory to tea farmers and working with them to support their farming methods and tea making styles.

View full article →