Nantou Global Tea Expo 2015: Lyrical Flowing Water, Dancing Cups Of Tea

October 07, 2015 2 Comments

The theme of this year's Nantou Global Tea Expo is rooted in the ancient Chinese custom of sharing refreshments and co-creating poetry and song while sitting beside a stream. This tradition dates back to the Jin Dynasty in the 4th Century.

Eco-Cha's Andy Kincart is attending daily, acting as the English interpreter for the event which runs from October 3-11. His tea mentor Lisa Lin sits streamside in the above photo, looking strikingly like you'd imagine those mural figures in the background being in real life. Testing the waters before the public tea sessions begin, Lisa is served tea by her co-hosts of the event. With the backdrop of a classic mural and the eloquent presentation by the hosts, something gets recreated. The photo below is the setting since the tea began brewing, flowing, and floating the morning of the first day.

In addition to the theme of tea floating on the stream, traditional Dong Ding Oolong, Japanese, Korean, Aboriginal, and modern Mainland Chinese tea sessions are held continuously throughout the event. Beyond these reservation only tea sessions, there is a sprawling market outside comprised of well over a hundred tea vendors from all over Taiwan, along with locally grown coffee, and a variety of fruits, vegetables, vinegars, preserves, honey, oils, candy, essential oils, soaps, and various other hand-crafted, locally-produced goods. Feature event activities to share in the days to come!





2 Responses

Andy Kincart
Andy Kincart

November 04, 2015

Richard,
There is an amazing turnout every year – tens-of-thousands show up for the event! And the Nantou County Global Tea Expo is only in its sixth year! Hopefully next year the government will finally listen to my offers to promote it on an international platform so that we can invite people from all over the world!

richard brandt
richard brandt

October 09, 2015

Wow…this is huge! I just participated in the North West Tea Festival in Seattle. Tiny by comparison….but it’s only in it’s 8th year and growing every year.
Was there ceramic tea ware offered at this event? Photos of them would be extra great!
All the best!
Hang in there Andy!

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